Eclipse Advanced Visualization Project 0.1 Release Review

Type: 
Release
State: 
Successful
End Date of the Review Period: 

Reviews run for a minimum of one week. The outcome of the review is decided on this date. This is the last day to make comments or ask questions about this review.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Release: 

0.1

Description: 

This is the first stable release of the code base since it was branched from Eclipse ICE. It includes many bug fixes and greatly improved functionality over the initial release. Of particular note to the community is the improved 3D geometry editing and post-processing visualization support.

API Certification: 

The project leadership certifies that the APIs in this release are "Eclipse Quality".

Architectural Issues: 

The major reason for moving EAVP into its own project and away from ICE was so that it could be rearchitected to support a more general plugin architecture for visualization tools. This release provides that architecture. There is a small amount of merge debt due to the creation of Eclipse January, which included some code from this project that has not yet been fully removed until January is ready.

Non-Code Aspects: 

This release is a development library that does not provide a user workbench. So, the documentation is focused purely on development APIs:

 

https://wiki.eclipse.org/EAVP_Service_Integration

 

We also have some tutorials on how to use the visualization services inside of ICE or any other Eclipse tool that integrates them:

 

https://wiki.eclipse.org/Visualizing_Output_with_ICE

https://wiki.eclipse.org/ICE_Embedded_Visualizations

https://wiki.eclipse.org/Editing_Meshes‚Äč

Usability Details: 

This release does not have a workbench. It can only be used as through client products that call the API. The developer API has been greatly improved over the course of this release with several users applauding the improvements.

Communities: 

This release is primarily of interest to the Science Working Group and associated entities. Interest in the project has steadily grown in the US national laboratories and in the private sector in the US and Europe. Discussions are happening mainly on the mailing list or by private email. The code has been part of four tutorials since EclipseCon North America.